everv0id:

If you need REAL cyberpunk, you should try Moscow.

everv0id:

If you need REAL cyberpunk, you should try Moscow.

(via rustcohlnikoff)

littlestfinchphotography:

Hall of Mirrors - Versailles, France (May 2013)

littlestfinchphotography:

Hall of Mirrors - Versailles, France (May 2013)

sniperkun:

sorry mom i cant go to school tomorrow its an international holiday

image

(via rustcohlnikoff)

royalindulgence:

italian-luxury:
Aurora Borealis, Finland http://italian-luxury.co/post/98395960150

royalindulgence:

italian-luxury:

Aurora Borealis, Finland http://italian-luxury.co/post/98395960150

(via metallurg1000)

historicaltimes:

Boy watching TV for the first time in an appliance store window, 1948

historicaltimes:

Boy watching TV for the first time in an appliance store window, 1948

science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light
A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye. One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.
Read more @CNET

science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light

A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye.
One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.

Read more @CNET

historicaltimes:

Constructing The Eiffel Tower in 1889

historicaltimes:

Constructing The Eiffel Tower in 1889

(via moriartythecrowned)

sapphrikah:

distant-relatives-blog:

The earliest evidence of ancient dentistry we have is an amazingly detailed dental work on a mummy from ancient Egypt that archaeologists have dated to 2000 BCE. The work shows intricate gold work around the teeth. This mummy was found with two donor teeth that had holes drilled into them. Wires were strung through the holes and then around the neighboring teeth.

Originators.

(Source: metalonmetalblog, via moriartythecrowned)

wanderthewood:

Ruined abbey in Walsingham, Norfolk, England by Oxfordshire Churches

wanderthewood:

Ruined abbey in Walsingham, Norfolk, England by Oxfordshire Churches

(via moriartythecrowned)

maplesuckup:

foxboy:

foxboy:

IM SO ANGRY THAT PINEAPPLES DONT GROW ON TREES

image

THIS PISSES ME OFF SO MUCH YOU DOTN EVEN KNOW

LET’S GET TO THE POINT

(via moriartythecrowned)

skunkbear:

Beautiful reconstructed hominin skulls — the early members of humanity’s family tree! You can see lots more on the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Flickr page.

(via science-junkie)

rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS for Endangered Birds:

Thirty-two whooping cranes fledged on Wood Buffalo NP

Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP - Canada) officials reported today that 32 whooping crane chicks were observed during this year’s Whooping Crane Fledging Survey. Wood Buffalo personnel took to the skies during August 9-12, 2014 and completed their annual survey.  During the 4 days the team counted 32 fledged young whooping cranes.

WBNP officials reported that a total of 202 whoopers were counted, including the fledgling and nesting pairs.  Fledglings are birds that have reached an age where they can fly. The 32 fledglings were found in 30 family groups: 28 families with one chick and two families with two chicks. In addition to the family groups, the surveyors observed 6 groups of three whooping cranes, 43 groups of two, and 6 individual cranes…

(read more: Friends of Wild Whoopers)

photos: John McKinnon and Jane Peterson / ©Parks Canada /Wood Buffalo National Park

(via moriartythecrowned)

curioos-arts:

Benjamin Simon / Dirk Schuster (Germany) via @Curioos by @weareforeal

curioos-arts:

Benjamin Simon / Dirk Schuster (Germany) 
via @Curioos by @weareforeal

(via moriartythecrowned)

spaceplasma:

Hedy Lamarr: Actress and Inventor

At the height of her Hollywood career, actress Hedy Lamarr was known as “the most beautiful woman in the world.” For most of her life, her legacy was her looks. But in the 1940s — in an attempt to help the war effort — she quietly invented what would become the precursor to many wireless technologies we use today, including Bluetooth, GPS, cellphone networks and more.
Hedy Lamarr was much more than “the most beautiful woman in the world”. The mathematically-minded inventor first learned about military technology from dinner party conversations between her arms-manufacturer husband and Nazi German generals, before escaping to America where she eventually invented a new torpedo guidance system for the U.S. Navy. Lamarr not only learned about the latest submarines and missiles but also the problems with them: notably the challenge of guiding a torpedo by radio, and shielding the signal from enemy interference.
Her insight was that you could protect wireless communication from jamming by varying the frequency at which radio signals were transmitted: if the channel was switched unpredictably, the enemy wouldn’t know which bands to block. But her ingenious “frequency-hopping” idea was just a hunch until Lamarr met fellow amateur inventor George Antheil.
This frequency hopping ability was designed with the idea to be utilised in the US military, allowing them to hide their torpedo’s radio signals from enemy ships. Although Lamarr and Antheil secured a patent for the idea in 1942 and presented the invention to the US Navy, the idea was not adopted during World War II as the inventors had intended. This was not due to the efficiency or feasibility of the idea, but largely to a misunderstanding of how it worked by those reviewing it for military use.
Lamarr approached the National Inventors Council with her frequency-hopping spread-spectrum invention wishing to join and assist the war effort utilising her technical abilities. However, she was advised by members instead to support the cause by using her celebrity status to sell war bonds. As one of the most desirable pin-ups during World War II, Lamarr was able to do this very successfully, although it meant that she was unknown and unaccredited as an inventor until 1997.
Lamarr’s frequency-hopping spread-spectrum invention was finally adopted and implemented on US Navy ships in 1962, by which time the patent had expired and Antheil had died. However, the Electronic Frontier Foundation awarded Lamarr’s contribution to technology in 1997, which finally exposed her to the world as a talented scientist and inventor.
Although intended for military use, Lamarr’s secret communication system actually acts as a basis from many modern communication techniques, making things such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi network connections and the technology used in some telephones possible. Satellite communication is another area where the ability to utilise frequency hopping allows communication to be possible without the threat of messages being infiltrated.
Lamarr should be showcased as an inspiration to all females interested in science and technology and as a woman who refuted the conventional in every aspect of her life.

spaceplasma:

Hedy Lamarr: Actress and Inventor

At the height of her Hollywood career, actress Hedy Lamarr was known as “the most beautiful woman in the world.” For most of her life, her legacy was her looks. But in the 1940s — in an attempt to help the war effort — she quietly invented what would become the precursor to many wireless technologies we use today, including Bluetooth, GPS, cellphone networks and more.

Hedy Lamarr was much more than “the most beautiful woman in the world”. The mathematically-minded inventor first learned about military technology from dinner party conversations between her arms-manufacturer husband and Nazi German generals, before escaping to America where she eventually invented a new torpedo guidance system for the U.S. Navy. Lamarr not only learned about the latest submarines and missiles but also the problems with them: notably the challenge of guiding a torpedo by radio, and shielding the signal from enemy interference.

Her insight was that you could protect wireless communication from jamming by varying the frequency at which radio signals were transmitted: if the channel was switched unpredictably, the enemy wouldn’t know which bands to block. But her ingenious “frequency-hopping” idea was just a hunch until Lamarr met fellow amateur inventor George Antheil.

This frequency hopping ability was designed with the idea to be utilised in the US military, allowing them to hide their torpedo’s radio signals from enemy ships. Although Lamarr and Antheil secured a patent for the idea in 1942 and presented the invention to the US Navy, the idea was not adopted during World War II as the inventors had intended. This was not due to the efficiency or feasibility of the idea, but largely to a misunderstanding of how it worked by those reviewing it for military use.

Lamarr approached the National Inventors Council with her frequency-hopping spread-spectrum invention wishing to join and assist the war effort utilising her technical abilities. However, she was advised by members instead to support the cause by using her celebrity status to sell war bonds. As one of the most desirable pin-ups during World War II, Lamarr was able to do this very successfully, although it meant that she was unknown and unaccredited as an inventor until 1997.

Lamarr’s frequency-hopping spread-spectrum invention was finally adopted and implemented on US Navy ships in 1962, by which time the patent had expired and Antheil had died. However, the Electronic Frontier Foundation awarded Lamarr’s contribution to technology in 1997, which finally exposed her to the world as a talented scientist and inventor.

Although intended for military use, Lamarr’s secret communication system actually acts as a basis from many modern communication techniques, making things such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi network connections and the technology used in some telephones possible. Satellite communication is another area where the ability to utilise frequency hopping allows communication to be possible without the threat of messages being infiltrated.

Lamarr should be showcased as an inspiration to all females interested in science and technology and as a woman who refuted the conventional in every aspect of her life.

(via moriartythecrowned)

weareallstarstuff:

Orion Nebula